A responsible growth strategy

It is not only consumers; it is all of your stakeholders who want to know what your business is doing to be socially and environmentally responsible. This influencing factor has the potential to build or break down your reputation; therefore, having authentic ‘Corporate Social Investment’ (CSI) initiatives is key to sustainable growth in any organisation.

The latest King IV report, launched by the Institute of Directors in Southern Africa (IoDSA) at the end of last year aims to reinforce principles of good corporate governance, ethical leadership, and sustainable development. The report starts off by speaking about a ‘changed world’1. An influencing drive for the change in corporate governance is climate change, as well as the environmental impacts which also affect people. This points to the fact that social and environmental issues are intertwined can never be treated separately. The quality of the environment and the resources it has to offer has a direct influence on the quality of life of the people living there. Businesses are also a part of society and therefore are in the advantageous position to have a positive influence towards change that addresses social and environmental issues.

“CSI, purely as a marketing attempt is not a good strategy. It is imperative to have an ongoing investment towards positive change,” says Chris Bischoff, research and sustainability specialist at Reputation Matters.

In this day and age, your average consumer is much more tuned in on specific environmental and social issues. Mentioned in King IV, social media, specifically Facebook and Twitter, is creating a world of radical transparency, especially when it comes to being transparent about environmental performance. More and more institutions and businesses are getting caught out, especially on social media, for not ‘walking their environmental talk’. This is known as ‘greenwashing’, saying that you have a responsibility towards reducing your environmental impact or footprint, however certain business decisions and actions suggest otherwise. This is why it is so important to have an authentic approach to your CSI initiatives.

“Not only does it pay dividends for the environment and the well-being of people, having an authentic commitment to environmental and social responsibility makes business sense. You open up the opportunity of becoming a strategic alliance. People and businesses want to be involved with other organisations that are socially and environmentally responsible, our research has shown this,” adds Bischoff.

CSI is a two way investment; in one sense it means investing in uplifting the quality of living of a society, and in another sense investing in that area of business that contributes to your corporate reputation. Having well-thought CSI initiatives aligned to your organisation’s vision and values will encourage employees to embody this responsibility, reflecting in their actions and decisions, and most likely taking this culture home from work.

If you would like to what people think about your corporate social and environmental responsibility, read more about Reputation Matters ‘Sustainability check’, a research tool which provides insight into stakeholders’ perceptions on your social and environmental responsibility.

1Institute of Directors Southern Africa (2016). King IV, Report of corporate governance South Africa.

From the Mother City to Manchester: Reputation Matters confirms partnership with research & insights specialists LOOKOUT!

South African corporate reputation management solutions company, Reputation Matters is joining forces with LOOKOUT!, an independent research and insights organisation based in Manchester, United Kingdom. As of Wednesday, 01 March 2017, Reputation Matters are able to offer their clients a full research and insights solution, over and above their Repudometer®, Reputation Matters’ scientific research tool. In addition, LOOKOUT! will add Reputation Matters Repudometer® to its portfolio of services.

Founder and Managing Director of Reputation Matters, Regine le Roux, says, “We are excited to have entered into this partnership with LOOKOUT!, our clients will benefit from their extensive research capabilities and team of 30+ researchers, and we are thrilled to be adding value to their portfolio with our acclaimed Repudometer®.”

Eugene Tansey, founder of LOOKOUT! comments, “We are delighted to be launching a South African operation in partnership with Reputation Matters. We look forward to assisting their clients with their research and insight needs and we are also excited to be adding the Repudometer® to our growing list of services. What makes this model unique is that it provides an actual, statistical percentage of what an organisation’s current reputation is and pinpoints the areas that require improvement.”

Reputation Matters is an acclaimed agency based in Cape Town and Johannesburg, which has enjoyed significant growth over the years. The Repudometer® is a scientific, unbiased model which is used to quantify an organisation’s reputation. Ten different dimensions of an organisation, including elements such as leadership, employee morale, strategic partners, value offering and communication management, to name a few are measured.

LOOKOUT! (formerly AccuSearch) rebranded in 2016. The company, based in Manchester, provides research, insights and creative consultancy on markets, industries, stakeholders, competitors, customers and employees to multinational organisations. The LOOKOUT! team of more than 30 researchers, completed projects in America, Asia, Europe and West Africa last year, and is excited to be entering the South African market with Reputation Matters.

For more information on these new services, visit www.reputationmatters.co.za/LOOKOUT or call 011 3173861 (Jhb) or 021 790 0208 (Cpt).

For more information about LOOKOUT! and the market research and strategic insights they offer, visit www.wearelookout.com or call +44 (0) 843 886 5884 (Manchester, UK).

Introducing our new research tool: the Sustainability Check

There is a growing awareness in the business community about responsible care and corporate environmental performance. “Green consumerism” as a market force along with the expansion of the Green Economy provides a strong incentive for organisations to determine and improve their reputation by having a commitment to Environmental Sustainability. Reputation Matters have developed a tool for organisations to take the next step towards a better reputation.

“We are proud to present our latest research tool, our Sustainability Check,” says Regine le Roux, Managing Director of Reputation Matters.  “The check has been modelled on the success of our Repudometer® and serves to provide clear insight into stakeholders’ perceptions of their corporate environmental and sustainability commitments,” adds le Roux.

Is your organisation’s core focus to be environmentally sustainable or do you just want to minimise your environmental footprint? “The Sustainability Check will provide businesses with tailored reputation management support to consolidate their organisation’s efforts in becoming environmentally responsible,” says Chris Bischoff, Research Analyst and environmental specialist who has recently joined the Reputation Matters team.

Bischoff explains how it works, “We use the same methodology as our Repudometer® to assess the five core elements of an organisation, namely Corporate Management, Corporate Capital, Corporate Positioning, Corporate Performance and Corporate Dialogue. This allows us to get a holistic view of a business’ stakeholder groups perception on their commitment to environmental sustainability.”

“It is a cost effective assessment that is designed for quick turnaround results. You can expect to be armoured with valuable information following the assessment which will inform your next decisions that will take your reputation to the next level,” concludes Bischoff.

To find out more about Reputation Matters and the reputation measurement and management solutions that they offer, visit www.reputationmatters.co.za or call: 011 3173861 (Jhb) or 021 790 0208 (Cpt).

Building reputations through transparent business results

American Businessman, Howard Schultz, once said: “When you’re building a business or joining a company, you have to be transparent; you can’t have two sets of information for two sets of people.”

Transparency is becoming increasingly essential to an organisation’s healthy reputation and continual operation in today’s socially conscious world. Active consumers and society demand that businesses play open cards with regards to financial health and shareholder value, as well as non-financial reporting and more.

“It is all good and well to be a financially strong organisation with wonderful business growth opportunities. However, without transparency in all dealings, these results do not mean much in terms of an organisation’s overall reputation,” says Regine le Roux, Managing Director of Reputation Matters. “Should stakeholders notice any discrepancies or inconsistencies in financial reporting, they will easily get suspicious and develop a sense of distrust towards the organisation,” explains le Roux.

Organisations face increasing pressure to report publicly, not just on financial performance but also on non-financial, social, environmental and ethical performance as well as on remuneration policies. In turn, this reporting is becoming increasingly more specific and measurable and therefore subject to independent scrutiny and audit. Transparent reporting is, therefore, a key reputational driver and holds endless benefits to organisations.

Transparent financial reporting helps investors and shareholders make decisions based on sound financial information. Having this information easily accessible will ensure that investors are more likely to consider investing in your organisation. “The same applies to clients, if they know that your organisation is open and honest in all its dealings, they will be more likely to trust and support your business over your competitors,” says le Roux.

“Business growth is just as important as being transparent in order to help build a strong organisational reputation,” adds le Roux. “It’s about creating shareholder value and it is believed that the only way to maximise this value and increase business growth is by ensuring client happiness and motivating employees.”

A mission-driven, value-centred organisation is able to motivate employees to create innovative products and superior client service that is sustainable over a long period of time. This, in turn, leads to increased client satisfaction and a competitive advantage that drives high revenue growth, with high-profit margins and high rates of growth in profitability. An organisation that proves to be profitable and sustainable will also prove to be commercially viable. Ultimately, this upward spiral of success attracting success contributes to a positive impact on the organisation’s overall reputation.

Le Roux shares pointers to keep in mind when it comes to building your reputation through business results:

  • Be transparent in all your doings, especially financial ones: disclose information, even though you may think it is insignificant.
  • Ethical behaviour is non-negotiable on all levels of the business: stakeholders are activists and are always scrutinising organisations for any inconsistencies or discrepancies. Manage your business in a way that it is a responsible and ethical participant in society.
  • Continuously build value for your shareholders: put yourself in your shareholders’ shoes and deliver the value to them that you would have wanted to receive.
  • Shareholder value is maximised by ensuring client happiness and motivating employees: keep your employees motivated and they will perform above what is expected and keep clients happy. If the clients are satisfied with the service and continue to support the organisation, shareholders will be pleased with the business results.

“By keeping these pointers in mind when conducting business, it will result in a win-win situation for both the organisation and its stakeholders,” concludes le Roux.

For more information on managing and investing in your reputation, visit www.reputationmatters.co.za or call +27 (0)11 317 3861. Reputation Matters is also on Facebook (www.facebook.com/yourreputationmatters) and Twitter (@ReputationIsKey).

Selecting the cream of the crop for your organisation

“If you think it’s expensive to hire a professional to do the job, wait until you hire an amateur”; wise words from Red Adair, an American oil well fire fighter.

When managing the reputation of any organisation, investing in the right people to do the job means that you are investing in the quality of your output.

Regine le Roux, Managing Director at Reputation Matters, mentions that human capital is a vital element when establishing and building on a positive reputation for your organisation: “Identifying the right calibre of people during the recruitment phase is directly aligned to the strategic intent of the organisation: knowing exactly where you are going with your business and who you need on your team to get you there. Getting this right at the onset will save you a lot of time, frustration and money in the future.”

How do you select the cream of the crop for different positions? Here are some tips:

  1. Set up strategic alliances: In order for you to build your reputation, you would need to employ individuals who can do the job and be an ambassador for your organisation. “At Reputation Matters we have really good strategic alliances that helps feed the recruitment funnel. We have a great relationship with the University of Pretoria’s Communication Management Department and offer their top BCom Communication Management honours students internship opportunities with us,” mentions le Roux.
  2. Implement a rigorous recruitment programme: Having a set recruitment programme for all applicants, in both small and larger organisations, is essential. “By having an in-depth online application form or process, you will be able to determine whether the person is serious about wanting the position; if they are, they will complete the form in full. It also demonstrates their basic use of spelling, grammar and industry knowledge,” says le Roux.
  3. Test their communication skills and contact references: The next round should always involve a phone call to determine how the candidates handle themselves telephonically. If they pass with flying colours, the first face-to-face interview is set up. “Should the interview go well, check references and then do personality profiling to get an idea of how they will fit in with the rest of the team. Culture fit is extremely important in any organisation and this needs to be determined from the get go,” adds le Roux.
  4. Presentation of a case study: “As the final step of our recruitment process, the candidate is given a case study to prepare and present to our team. By implementing this, we are able to pick the best candidates for different positions, as it often highlights their strengths and shows their way of thinking,” mentions le Roux.

Le Roux explains that once you have selected the ideal candidate, a thorough induction is necessary to help them get to grips with ‘how things are done around here’. “During this session the vision, core values and culture are discussed. This instils a level of respect and understanding for the organisation and leaves very little room for misinterpretation; it helps the candidate grasp exactly what the expectations are. This important step links back to strategic intent and operational governance, with the message and vision being reiterated right from the top,” says le Roux.

Building a reputation is about getting the right team in place from the onset, ensuring that everyone is on the same page regarding the business goals and vision.

For more information on managing and investing in your reputation, visit www.reputationmatters.co.za or call +27 (0)11 317 3861. Reputation Matters is also on Facebook (www.facebook.com/yourreputationmatters) and Twitter (@ReputationIsKey).

Selecting the cream of the crop for your organisation

“If you think it’s expensive to hire a professional to do the job, wait until you hire an amateur”; wise words from Red Adair, an American oil well fire fighter.

When managing the reputation of any organisation, investing in the right people to do the job means that you are investing in the quality of your output.

Regine le Roux, Managing Director at Reputation Matters, mentions that human capital is a vital element when establishing and building on a positive reputation for your organisation: “Identifying the right calibre of people during the recruitment phase is directly aligned to the strategic intent of the organisation: knowing exactly where you are going with your business and who you need on your team to get you there. Getting this right at the onset will save you a lot of time, frustration and money in the future.”

How do you select the cream of the crop for different positions? Here are some tips:

  1. Set up strategic alliances: In order for you to build your reputation, you would need to employ individuals who can do the job and be an ambassador for your organisation. “At Reputation Matters we have really good strategic alliances that helps feed the recruitment funnel. We have a great relationship with the University of Pretoria’s Communication Management Department and offer their top BCom Communication Management honours students internship opportunities with us,” mentions le Roux.
  2. Implement a rigorous recruitment programme: Having a set recruitment programme for all applicants, in both small and larger organisations, is essential. “By having an in-depth online application form or process, you will be able to determine whether the person is serious about wanting the position; if they are, they will complete the form in full. It also demonstrates their basic use of spelling, grammar and industry knowledge,” says le Roux.
  3. Test their communication skills and contact references: The next round should always involve a phone call to determine how the candidates handle themselves telephonically. If they pass with flying colours, the first face-to-face interview is set up. “Should the interview go well, check references and then do personality profiling to get an idea of how they will fit in with the rest of the team. Culture fit is extremely important in any organisation and this needs to be determined from the get go,” adds le Roux.
  4. Presentation of a case study: “As the final step of our recruitment process, the candidate is given a case study to prepare and present to our team. By implementing this, we are able to pick the best candidates for different positions, as it often highlights their strengths and shows their way of thinking,” mentions le Roux.

Le Roux explains that once you have selected the ideal candidate, a thorough induction is necessary to help them get to grips with ‘how things are done around here’. “During this session the vision, core values and culture are discussed. This instils a level of respect and understanding for the organisation and leaves very little room for misinterpretation; it helps the candidate grasp exactly what the expectations are. This important step links back to strategic intent and operational governance, with the message and vision being reiterated right from the top,” says le Roux.

Building a reputation is about getting the right team in place from the onset, ensuring that everyone is on the same page regarding the business goals and vision.

For more information on managing and investing in your reputation, visit www.reputationmatters.co.za or call +27 (0)11 317 3861. Reputation Matters is also on Facebook (www.facebook.com/yourreputationmatters) and Twitter (@ReputationIsKey).

Operational Capability: The right tools for the job

“Technology is nothing. What’s important is that you have faith in people, that they’re basically good and smart, and if you give them tools, they’ll do wonderful things with them.” – Steve Jobs

Technology is a powerful tool that empowers people to do what they want to do and to do it better. “It is all about potential; the right tools provide the right people with multiple opportunities to improve their skills and capabilities, ultimately delivering higher quality work,” explains Regine le Roux, Managing Director at Reputation Matters. “Technology and a stable infrastructure play an important role when it comes to running an organisation and ultimately your reputation,” she adds.

When employers provide employees with the right tools, they empower them to be creative and productive in the workplace; it helps employees learn things that they didn’t think they could learn before. “Operational capability is the ability to align critical processes, resources and technologies according to the overall guiding vision of an organisation, coupled with the ability to deliver these processes effectively and efficiently,” says le Roux.

Having the right tools at your disposal is key. “An organisation’s technology does not need to be the latest and greatest investment. It does, however, need to work and be used properly,” says le Roux. “A chink in one part of your organisational armour, regardless of how small or insignificant you may think it is, could have a major impact on how you are perceived; ultimately affecting your reputation,” she continues.

One can only be so innovative or creative with limited tools at your disposal; investing in the right tools and infrastructure is therefore really important, especially when your reputation relies on it.

When it comes to investing in tools to do your job, consider the following:

  • Keep it simple; you can do amazing things with inexpensive technology ideas.
  • Align your organisation’s technology needs to your overall business strategy.
  • Let your technology choices be kind to the environment.
  • Don’t fall for the latest fads.
  • Consider your technology partners carefully.

You don’t need expensive tools to engage with your stakeholders. “You can do wonders with a single phone line and link to the internet (when they both work). Mind you, these days you can do amazing things armed with a smartphone and the right Apps at your disposal,” explains le Roux.

“In one of our research studies, it was clear that employees’ morale was quite low, and on further investigation, we saw that each branch felt quite isolated because none of the branches knew what the others were up to,” says le Roux. On an individual level, employees said that they felt invisible. “With a very limited budget, we tested two ideas, which once again proves the value of research and importance of technology. Firstly we sent an SMS to someone on their birthday from the MD’s office, and also a text to the rest of the organisation to let them know who was celebrating a birthday. We also introduced an internal mailer where stories across the divisions and branches were shared to keep everyone in the loop,” she adds. Both these initiatives are still being used successfully today and it did not cost an arm and a leg to set up or maintain.

Being innovative and investing in technology leads to better use of valuable time and resources. It is important to stay on trend, keeping up to date with the latest technological tools aimed at making your organisation more efficient. Do not, however, fall for all the latest technology fads; this can be quite an expensive investment financially and a waste of work hours if not managed strategically.

“Technology, as Steve Jobs says, is nothing; it is about arming your troops with the right tools and believing in their skills. Having the right support, infrastructure and technology opens your world to new possibilities and proves that anything and everything is possible if you have the right mental attitude and the right tools,” concludes le Roux.

For more information on managing and investing in your reputation, visitwww.reputationmatters.co.za or call +27 (0)11 317 3861. Reputation Matters is also on Facebook (www.facebook.com/yourreputationmatters) and Twitter (@ReputationIsKey).

Walk your talk and improve your reputation

Businesses don’t fail, leaders do. In the words of Henry A. Kissinger, “The task of the leader is to get his people from where they are to where they have not been.” Leaders need to walk their talk; operational governance is an important building block in managing a lasting, positive reputation. Regine le Roux, Managing Director at Reputation Matters, shares insights on how this key element exemplifies your reputation to your stakeholders.

Building a strong corporate reputation is all about consistency, which is fundamental in successfully running an organisation. To ensure consistency within an organisation, it is vital to align operational governance namely the organisation’s rules, processes, procedures and policies to its strategic intent, and ultimately having the leader of the organisation walk their talk.

“Operational governance essentially establishes the ground rules for conducting your day-to-day business; its purpose is to clarify the intervention scope of some areas, defining reporting and decision flows, what needs be done and by whom and who the buck stops with,” shares le Roux. “It is the organisational component that establishes the frontier with operational activities. In our line of work, we very often see that there is no alignment between the strategic levels of an organisation and their operational levels. They might have very good intentions to give excellent service or provide quality products, without having the necessary operational governance in place,” continues le Roux.

Communicating policies and procedures ineffectively poses a colossal threat to an organisation’s reputation, especially on internal governance structures. It is therefore crucial not only to have procedural structures and policies in place, but also to communicate these internally, so that all parties understand what they should be doing, how they should do it and why it is important.

Le Roux motivates that a two-way conversation will enable feedback from key stakeholders to raise and address any uncertainties before issues arise; in that way the processes can be refined even further.

“Leadership within the organisation needs to be seen as ‘walking the talk’, and leading by example; they themselves need to be seen following protocol when it comes to company rules to ensure business continuity,” says le Roux. “As a leader myself, it is paramount that I lead by example by keeping in line with my organisation’s vision, mission and values. Similarly, it is also important to have operational governance structures in place for all stakeholder groups, including external groups such as: customers, suppliers, distributors and the media, to name just a few. The first step is to identify key stakeholder groups, each with its own set of governing structures and communication platforms in place,” she adds.

“It is essential that everyone within the organisation is familiar with company rules for each of the stakeholder groups so that they can speak with the same voice when engaging with different stakeholders,” explains le Roux. Echoing the same message from within is crucial for organisations. It eliminates confusion and inconsistency; and ultimately builds trust in how the company operates.

As an example, having clear and consistent payment terms and conditions outlined across the board for customers and suppliers from the outset of the relationship, will level the playing field and let everyone know what the expectations are right from the start. This will allow everyone to plan accordingly. Without procedures in place, an organisation sets itself up for a catastrophe. As Benjamin Franklin once said, “If you fail to plan, you are planning to fail.”

“When it comes to corporate governance, communication is the glue that brings it all together. Consistent communication about operational governance builds reliability, which ultimately builds trust and positively impacts corporate reputation,” concludes le Roux.

For more information on managing and investing in your reputation, visit www.reputationmatters.co.za or call +27 (0)11 317 3861. Reputation Matters is also on Facebook (www.facebook.com/yourreputationmatters) and Twitter (@ReputationIsKey).

Stop being taken for a PR ride

Stop being taken for a ride by your public relations (PR) company or ‘social media agency’ and stop throwing exorbitant amounts of money at communication efforts that are not well planned or strategically sound. A press release is not a silver bullet that is going to magically solve your sales problems, nor is a beautiful Facebook page.

“When it comes to your organisation’s reputation, every aspect of the business contributes to how it is being perceived. Perceptions may not necessarily be correct, however they are somebody’s reality and do need to be managed,” says Regine le Roux, Managing Director of Reputation Matters.

“Only once you understand exactly what these perceptions are, and which areas of the business is important to which stakeholder groups can you effectively put a reputation management strategy and communication plan in place,” explains le Roux.

“Too often business owners think that a clever press release or quirky marketing campaign is going to increase their sales. You can spend a ton of money on a fancy communication campaign but if your internal business building blocks are not in place, you may actually do a lot more harm than good,” adds le Roux. These building blocks, explains le Roux, include having the right processes, people and pricing principles in place; all of which needs to be glued together by a strategic internal and external communication plan.

Le Roux will be presenting a reputation management master class at the upcoming International Association of Business Communication (IABC) conference taking place at the Vineyard in Cape Town on 02 November 2016. She will be facilitating an interactive workshop on what it takes to enhance and improve your reputation, and will guide delegates on how to develop their own reputation strategies and plans. “After the session the delegates will have a very comprehensive idea of what they need to do to take their company’s reputation to the next level,” adds le Roux.

“Collaboration and agility is the new communication frontier in business,” says Carol Allers, IABC Chairperson. “At the conference we’ll be bringing together thought leaders from across the communication spectrum to engage, collaborate, network and most importantly to share their knowledge of business communication,” concludes Allers.

The IABC Conference will be taking place from 02 to 04 November 2016 at the Vineyard Hotel and Spa in Cape Town. For more information about the Conference visit: http://www.iabc.co.za/2016/02/17/iabc-africa-23rd-annual-conference-2016-registrations-are-now-open/

For more about managing your reputation visit www.reputationmatters.co.za Join the reputation conversation on Twitter @ReputationIsKey and  Facebook www.facebook.com/yourreputationmatters.

Is there real value in having a vision?

Management courses are never complete without a discussion of visions, missions, objectives and goals, however do leaders of companies really know how impactful a clearly defined strategic intent can be on their business’ reputation?

Founder and Managing Director of Reputation Matters, Regine le Roux is certain that while some corporates may consider business values as ‘stale’ or going out of fashion, they are critical for good reputation management. “All businesses must have a vision that is translated into a meaningful mission, objectives and specific goals. It is the first business building block to know what the business is about and where it is heading towards.”

Le Roux warns that the important link between strategic intent and reputation should not be overlooked. “Employees play a fundamental role in a business’ strategic intent as their work contributes towards achieving the vision, making it critical to communicate this to employees.”

Having sat around many a boardroom table discussing strategic intent, le Roux has far too often seen executives become confused when finding that they all have a different version of the business vision. “It goes without saying that this type of confusion has a major impact on the ultimate reputation of the organisation. When internal perceptions are misaligned and employees don’t know the vision of the business, how are they supposed to help achieve it?” she asks.

When the vision is not clear to a few senior managers, just imagine what the rest of the employees and other associated stakeholders may think, comments le Roux. “If an organisation can’t be aligned internally, there is no way of expecting external stakeholders such as customers, partners or the media to be on the same page. The larger the discrepancy regarding strategic intent, the worse the impact will be to the organisation’s reputation.”

Correcting such problems, shares le Roux, is about aligning the core concepts of the strategic intent to an organisation’s key communication initiatives. Key messages must be identified and communicated to the different stakeholder audiences. She further explains, that the crux of the message should be aligned to the overall, single-minded strategic intent of the company, regardless of the different stakeholders the business speaks to.

Regular communication of these key messages on the most appropriate channels of communication is important, says le Roux.  “These channels differ from organisation to organisation, however, very often the most effective channels of communication are not necessarily the most expensive.”

Feedback from stakeholders through research is also valuable. “When we measure an organisation’s reputation with our unique Repudometer® tool, we analyse the strategic direction of the organisation,” explains le Roux. “Through analysis of feedback from respondents we can ascertain whether the concepts and terminology used to define the business’ direction is appropriate and understood by all.” This, le Roux says, helps to identify gaps and pick up on any misaligned perceptions. Based on the research results, Reputation Matters offers customised recommendations to help take the organisation’s reputation to the next level by shaping the strategic intent into a clear direction and assisting the organisation with focussing on creating new capabilities to maximise future opportunities.

For more information on managing and investing in your reputation, visit www.reputationmatters.co.za or call +27 (0)11 317 3861. Reputation Matters is also on Facebook (www.facebook.com/yourreputationmatters) and Twitter (@ReputationIsKey).