Public invited to comment on the Draft Environmental Impact Report available for proposed Drakenstein Waste Recovery, Beneficiation and Energy Project

The Drakenstein Municipality encourages the public to review and comment on the Draft Environmental Impact Report (DEIR) for the proposed Drakenstein Waste Recovery, Beneficiation and Energy Project. There are currently three possible sites earmarked for the project: a preferred and an alternative site on Erf 34 in Wellington (both are located in close proximity to the existing Wellington Landfill Site) as well as Erf 736 in Klapmuts. The public’s comments, involvement and feedback is very important.

Interwaste is the applicant for the proposed Waste Recovery, Beneficiation and Energy Project (Project). The Project is envisaged to play an important role in Drakenstein Municipality’s effort to divert waste from its current Wellington landfill site and in return generate energy from waste material. The existing site is running out of landfill airspace and based on current disposal tonnages (volumes), will need to close by 2023. The Project will have four main components: Materials Recovery Facility, Municipal Solid Waste Pressing Plant, Anaerobic Digestion Plant, and a Direct Combustion Plant.

Acting Municipal Manager of the Drakenstein Municipality, Jacques Carstens, says, “There are many benefits associated with the proposed Project. Should it be approved by the Department of Environmental Affairs, following their stringent processes, the Project will be one step further to reduce Drakenstein’s waste sent to landfill and extend the current landfill’s lifespan from 2023 to 2035. The Project will be a first for municipalities in South Africa and will consist of the latest, globally acceptable waste recovery and beneficiation technology. The Project will also enable Drakenstein Municipality to maintain affordable waste tariffs for residents and will have a longer term positive impact on its electricity costs. Very importantly, the Project will be a catalyst for job creation and economic development.”

The Draft Environmental Impact Report, compiled by independent environmental consultancy, Resource Management Services (RMS) can be viewed online at www.rmsenviro.co.za as well as at the Wellington, Paarl and Mbekweni Public Libraries until Wednesday, 30 November 2016. An electronic Executive Summary is available on request. Written comments need to be submitted to Resource Management Services (Larry Eichstadt) at larry@rmsenviro.co.za no later than 30 November 2016.

The public are invited to attend Public Open Days and Public Meetings which will take place in early November 2016:

  1. Public Open Day: 08 November 2016, 14:30 to 16:30, Rusticana Hospitality Estate, Klapmuts
  2. Public Open Day: 08 November 2016, 18:30 to 20:30, Breakthrough Restoration Community Church, Wellington (Corner of Blossom & Klaasen Streets)
  3. Public Open Day: 09 November 2016, 14:30 to 17:00, NG Gemeente Kerk Wellington Noord (Maccrone Street)
  4. Public Meeting: 09 November 2016, 18:30 to 21:30, NG Gemeente Kerk Wellington Noord

“Public participation in all processes related to the Project is essential. We encourage all residents to find out more about the initiative and to take the opportunity to raise any concerns they may have by attending these open days and meetings,” concludes Carstens.

For more information about the Drakenstein Waste Recovery, Beneficiation and Energy Project, please visit their website.

Choir provides a ray of sunshine in the community

Music brings people together; it brings joy, entertainment and healing. In underprivileged communities, it can be a powerful tool that unlocks opportunity and social empowerment. The National Children and Violence Trust (NCVT) harnesses the power of music through its choirs in Cosmo City and Diepsloot which provide unemployed youth, aged 16 to 27 years, with an alternative to crime, drugs and other illegal activities.

NCVT’s choirs are growing quickly. “In Cosmo City, the choir has been running for just over a year now and consists of 30 members. The Diepsloot choir started only two months ago and already has 18 members,” says Mpumi Mndaweni, senior social worker at NCVT. Other than providing entertainment at NCVT’s various community empowerment events, the choirs are often invited to perform at weddings and other events.

As much as music provides entertainment, it can play a far deeper role in dealing with trauma and grief. No one knows this better than Nondumiso Msibi, musical director of the NCVT’s choirs.

[CAPTION]: NCVT’s musical director, Nondumiso Msibi is working with young people in Diepsloot and Cosmo City. She has been on her own journey of healing through song. 

Msibi grew up with music in the home. Her father, Makhosonke, was a choir leader himself. He instilled a love for the musical arts within his daughter and trained her to lead choirs. Unfortunately, this came to an abrupt end in 2013 when he was shot and killed at home by intruders. Msibi kept singing, though, finding healing in musical expression after her loss. In 2015, NCVT recruited her as a full-time music director and she has been providing healing to others through song ever since.

CAPTION: Members of the NCVT youth choir. From left to right: Thokozani Gama, Junior Phesiya, Thapelo Montsho, Nondumiso Msibi, Tshepo Pelembe and Orapeleng Takalase. 

“There is a great interest in our musical group and we have so much fun during training and performances,” says Msibi. “The choir members are eager to gain experience and learn about the music. We would love to record our own CD at some point, especially now that the Diepsloot group is growing so well. Funds are just a bit on the short side; it would also be great to find a sponsor for uniforms.”

Mndaweni says that she looks forward to seeing the choirs grow over the months and years to come. “Music makes the soul come alive in so many different ways,” states Mndaweni. “We believe that this will not be just another singing group, but one that enriches those involved, develops them emotionally and socially and expands their career options,” she concludes.

For more information about NCVT or to make a donation, contact +27 11 705 1960 or visit http://www.ncvt.co.za/. Join NCVT’s Facebook page at https://www.facebook.com/The-National-Children-Violence-Trust-NCVT-197670257245796/ or tweet them @NCVT_ZA.

Selecting the cream of the crop for your organisation

“If you think it’s expensive to hire a professional to do the job, wait until you hire an amateur”; wise words from Red Adair, an American oil well fire fighter.

When managing the reputation of any organisation, investing in the right people to do the job means that you are investing in the quality of your output.

Regine le Roux, Managing Director at Reputation Matters, mentions that human capital is a vital element when establishing and building on a positive reputation for your organisation: “Identifying the right calibre of people during the recruitment phase is directly aligned to the strategic intent of the organisation: knowing exactly where you are going with your business and who you need on your team to get you there. Getting this right at the onset will save you a lot of time, frustration and money in the future.”

How do you select the cream of the crop for different positions? Here are some tips:

  1. Set up strategic alliances: In order for you to build your reputation, you would need to employ individuals who can do the job and be an ambassador for your organisation. “At Reputation Matters we have really good strategic alliances that helps feed the recruitment funnel. We have a great relationship with the University of Pretoria’s Communication Management Department and offer their top BCom Communication Management honours students internship opportunities with us,” mentions le Roux.
  2. Implement a rigorous recruitment programme: Having a set recruitment programme for all applicants, in both small and larger organisations, is essential. “By having an in-depth online application form or process, you will be able to determine whether the person is serious about wanting the position; if they are, they will complete the form in full. It also demonstrates their basic use of spelling, grammar and industry knowledge,” says le Roux.
  3. Test their communication skills and contact references: The next round should always involve a phone call to determine how the candidates handle themselves telephonically. If they pass with flying colours, the first face-to-face interview is set up. “Should the interview go well, check references and then do personality profiling to get an idea of how they will fit in with the rest of the team. Culture fit is extremely important in any organisation and this needs to be determined from the get go,” adds le Roux.
  4. Presentation of a case study: “As the final step of our recruitment process, the candidate is given a case study to prepare and present to our team. By implementing this, we are able to pick the best candidates for different positions, as it often highlights their strengths and shows their way of thinking,” mentions le Roux.

Le Roux explains that once you have selected the ideal candidate, a thorough induction is necessary to help them get to grips with ‘how things are done around here’. “During this session the vision, core values and culture are discussed. This instils a level of respect and understanding for the organisation and leaves very little room for misinterpretation; it helps the candidate grasp exactly what the expectations are. This important step links back to strategic intent and operational governance, with the message and vision being reiterated right from the top,” says le Roux.

Building a reputation is about getting the right team in place from the onset, ensuring that everyone is on the same page regarding the business goals and vision.

For more information on managing and investing in your reputation, visit www.reputationmatters.co.za or call +27 (0)11 317 3861. Reputation Matters is also on Facebook (www.facebook.com/yourreputationmatters) and Twitter (@ReputationIsKey).

Selecting the cream of the crop for your organisation

“If you think it’s expensive to hire a professional to do the job, wait until you hire an amateur”; wise words from Red Adair, an American oil well fire fighter.

When managing the reputation of any organisation, investing in the right people to do the job means that you are investing in the quality of your output.

Regine le Roux, Managing Director at Reputation Matters, mentions that human capital is a vital element when establishing and building on a positive reputation for your organisation: “Identifying the right calibre of people during the recruitment phase is directly aligned to the strategic intent of the organisation: knowing exactly where you are going with your business and who you need on your team to get you there. Getting this right at the onset will save you a lot of time, frustration and money in the future.”

How do you select the cream of the crop for different positions? Here are some tips:

  1. Set up strategic alliances: In order for you to build your reputation, you would need to employ individuals who can do the job and be an ambassador for your organisation. “At Reputation Matters we have really good strategic alliances that helps feed the recruitment funnel. We have a great relationship with the University of Pretoria’s Communication Management Department and offer their top BCom Communication Management honours students internship opportunities with us,” mentions le Roux.
  2. Implement a rigorous recruitment programme: Having a set recruitment programme for all applicants, in both small and larger organisations, is essential. “By having an in-depth online application form or process, you will be able to determine whether the person is serious about wanting the position; if they are, they will complete the form in full. It also demonstrates their basic use of spelling, grammar and industry knowledge,” says le Roux.
  3. Test their communication skills and contact references: The next round should always involve a phone call to determine how the candidates handle themselves telephonically. If they pass with flying colours, the first face-to-face interview is set up. “Should the interview go well, check references and then do personality profiling to get an idea of how they will fit in with the rest of the team. Culture fit is extremely important in any organisation and this needs to be determined from the get go,” adds le Roux.
  4. Presentation of a case study: “As the final step of our recruitment process, the candidate is given a case study to prepare and present to our team. By implementing this, we are able to pick the best candidates for different positions, as it often highlights their strengths and shows their way of thinking,” mentions le Roux.

Le Roux explains that once you have selected the ideal candidate, a thorough induction is necessary to help them get to grips with ‘how things are done around here’. “During this session the vision, core values and culture are discussed. This instils a level of respect and understanding for the organisation and leaves very little room for misinterpretation; it helps the candidate grasp exactly what the expectations are. This important step links back to strategic intent and operational governance, with the message and vision being reiterated right from the top,” says le Roux.

Building a reputation is about getting the right team in place from the onset, ensuring that everyone is on the same page regarding the business goals and vision.

For more information on managing and investing in your reputation, visit www.reputationmatters.co.za or call +27 (0)11 317 3861. Reputation Matters is also on Facebook (www.facebook.com/yourreputationmatters) and Twitter (@ReputationIsKey).

World Polio Day: celebrating the efforts made to eradicate the disease

[CAPTION] Today, World Polio Day, provides a chance to celebrate the progress that has been made in the eradication of the virus. Since 1979, Rotary International has been combating poliomyelitis (polio), an untreatable but vaccine-preventable disease. Back then, the world saw about 1 000 new cases of polio daily; in 2015, less than 75 cases occurred the world over. This radical decline is largely due to generous donations by organisations such as the Rotary Club of Claremont. [Photo credit: Rotary International.]

World Polio Day seeks to raise awareness of the poliomyelitis (polio) disease: it is an infectious disease that occurs mainly in children, targeting the nervous system and causing paralysis. At this stage, there is no cure for this virus. ”Eradicating polio globally has been a core focus for Rotary International,” says Ian Pursch, District Governor for Rotary’s District 9350, which includes Western and Northern Cape; Namibia and Angola. “Rotary is the largest private sector donor to the cause, helping to enable advances in research and medical innovations for ridding the planet of the disease,” adds Pursch.

South African children don’t need to fear polio, as our country has been polio-free for more than two decades. In other parts of Africa and the world where polio still occurs, Rotary International remains hard at work to eradicate the disease through its Polio Plus Project. Rotarians across the globe volunteer time and money toward the cause, to provide children with a vaccine that guarantees them a polio-free life.

Over the last five years, the Rotary Club of Claremont’s financial contribution towards Polio Plus amounts to more than R 250 000. Tomorrow, 25 October 2016, Rotary Claremont will be investing a further R 70 000 in the project by way of a cheque to the District Foundation Committee to help get the life-saving vaccine to those who need it.

“Rotary International took up the fight against polio in 1979 and have helped to decrease the number of global polio cases by 99.9%,” says Ian Robertson, president of the Rotary Club of Claremont. “Our contribution will help in the battle to completely eliminate the virus. It is an extraordinary legacy to be a part of.”

For more information on Rotary Club of Claremont and the various community projects and initiatives they are involved with, please visit http://claremontrotary.co.za/.

Educare Centre in Philippi saved from complete shut-down

 

 

 

 

 

CAPTION: Nolufefe Educare Centre in Philippi has been saved from a complete shut-down. The dilapidated prefabricated building, which was declared structurally unsafe by engineers, has been temporarily closed so that work can begin on Monday next week (24 October 2016) to completely refurbish the Centre and add a new section to it, thanks to the Rotary Club of Claremont’s Injongo Project, in partnership with the Lewis Group. [High resolution images available on request]

Eighty-nine children under the age of six attended the Nolufefe Educare Centre. However, their safety was a concern to the community and so the premises were formally vacated earlier this month. The children are now based at a temporary venue so that construction work can commence shortly. The refurbished Educare Centre will be complete by the end of March next year.

“Renovations and new buildings are just one element of Rotary’s Injongo Project which has already worked with 47 other Educare Centres in Philippi,” explains Ian Robertson, President of the Rotary Club of Claremont. The Injongo Project is the largest of its kind in the country, with a total spend of R12 million to date. “The idea is to work holistically with Educare Centres to ensure early childhood development takes place with the best possible outcomes. This involves equipping teachers with the skills they need to offer educationally stimulating learning opportunities for young children before they start formal schooling in Grade 1.”

“The granting of government subsidies are dependent upon educare centres meeting minimum standards and health and safety requirements. The Injongo Project’s swift action has saved Nolufefe Educare Centre from a complete shut-down by authorities,” adds Robertson.

Lewis has partnered with the Rotary Club of Claremont’s Injongo Project for the past five years. “We are committed to uplifting the communities in which we operate. We are delighted to make a meaningful difference in developing the young lives of the local children, providing them with opportunities to thrive in their inspiring new educational envi­ronment, which we know will provide excellent opportunities for a great number of children for many years to come,” says Johan Enslin, CEO of the Lewis Group.

For more information on Rotary Club of Claremont and the various community projects and initiatives they are involved with, please visit http://claremontrotary.co.za/.

Advances in waste management discussed at WasteCon 2016

The Institute of Waste Management of Southern Africa (IWMSA)’s flagship biennial waste management conference, WasteCon 2016, officially opened on Tuesday, 18 October 2016 at Emperors Palace in Johannesburg. Torben Kristiansen (above), Vice President of Waste and Contaminated Sites at COWI A/S based in Denmark opened the event as a keynote speaker. The conference, which welcomed over 350 delegates and 200 exhibitors will focus on the recent changes experienced in the waste management landscape.

This year celebrates the 23rd WasteCon with industry experts sharing best practices about the ever-changing waste management arena over the course of four days.

Jonathan Shamrock, Chairman of the WasteCon 2016 Organising Committee, says, “At this year’s conference we see a shift in focus to resource recovery and alternatives to landfilling. The reality is that South Africa is running out of landfill airspace and waste as a resource is becoming ever more prominent.”

The keynote speaker, Torben Kristiansen reiterated that Africa faces many challenges. “We actually don’t know how much waste we have and what is happening to it, so we have trouble planning in advance,” said Kristiansen. However, he mentioned that there are also many opportunities for ‘adding tools to our toolbox of waste management’, including recycling and converting waste to energy. “We are embarking on a journey toward a circular economy, but it requires an immense paradigm shift. I believe that we should start making the shift now and this conference is a brilliant opportunity.”

The IWMSA is also celebrating their 40th year of promoting a clean and healthy environment. Jan Palm, incoming president of the IWMSA, said how excited he is about his new role and his next two years in office: “We have a very diverse membership and we cover all themes of waste management. It is only by covering all of these themes that we can successfully contribute to promoting sustainable waste management practices.”

The main themes at the conference are recycling, waste management and landfill engineering. The latest products will also be displayed by exhibitors, which the public are welcome to come and view between 13:30 and 14:45 on Wednesday, free of charge. Visitors are required to obtain a visitor’s card at the registration desk upon arrival.

WasteCon 2016 is taking place until Thursday, 20 October 2016.

The IWMSA would like to thank all sponsors and patrons for making WasteCon 2016 possible. For more information about WasteCon2016 and to register, please visit www.wastecon.co.za.

For more information about the IWMSA, visit www.iwmsa.co.za. IWMSA is also on Facebook (www.facebook.com/iwmsa) and Twitter (https://twitter.com/IWMSA).

Siyabonga Swelindawo – former Zip Zapper paying it forward

 

CAPTION: Siyabonga Swelindawo’s life changed when he joined the Zip Zap Circus School at the age of 11 in 1999. Now the 27-year-old professional juggler, and SA’s Got Talent semi-finalist, is helping transform other youngsters’ lives through an after school arts initiative of the Western Cape Department of Cultural Affairs and Sport. [Photo credit: Zip Zap Circus School]

 

Swelindawo describes his childhood, growing up in Khayelitsha, as a rough juggling act. Over weekends he was sent to stay with his aunt when adults at home would drink too much. He ended up living with her permanently while attending Eluxolweni Primary School. It was at this stage that the young boy joined the Non-Profit Organisation, Zip Zap Circus School. As he learnt to excel in the art of juggling, his dreams of becoming a professional soccer player turned to that of circus star.

 

Juggling opened up his world and for the next eleven years, Swelindawo was part of the Zip Zap family. As a professional performer and Zip Zap instructor, he went on tours to Spain, Switzerland, Germany, France, Belgium and Australia, not to mention performances all over South Africa. “If I wasn’t involved in the circus I don’t think I would’ve travelled to those places,” he says, adding that a highlight was meeting and performing on stage with Miriam Makeba in Holland. After finishing school he moved into Zip Zap’s House in Observatory – a safe, subsidised accommodation option for Zip Zap’s professional performers and trainers who have no alternative place to stay.

 

While busy with circus life, Swelindawo studied Electrical Engineering at the College of Cape Town and graduated with a Diploma in 2013. Despite an attractive job offer in this sector, he chose instead to sow back into Cape Town’s poorest communities using the juggling skills learnt at Zip Zap.

 

Now Swelindawo is working full time for the Western Cape Department of Cultural Affairs and Sport, heading up the juggling code for the Mass participation; Opportunity and access, Development and growth (MOD) programme. This initiative provides sporting and arts activities to more than 40 000 children from over 300 disadvantaged and underserved schools in the province. “We work with the children from after school until 18:00, the idea is to keep them busy and out of trouble. The programme also gives rising stars the opportunity to hone their skills and possibly turn professional in a particular sporting or arts code.” Swelindawo is proud of the young protégés in the juggling section he manages: “These children, who I started teaching in 2014, are now juggling like crazy! Give them two more years and they’ll be right on top,” he says.

 

Laurence Estève, co-founder and Director of Zip Zap Circus School is just as proud of Swelindawo as he is of his own charges. “It is an honour to keep in touch with the Zip Zap alumni who were some of our first circus stars. They are now thriving as adults, leading fulfilling and successful lives and excelling on and off stage. The impact Siyabonga has through his job working for the province is just one part of Zip Zap’s success story.”

 

To make tax-deductible donations to Zip Zap, visit the website www.zip-zap.co.za or contact 021 421 8622 or donate via Thundafund here. Find Zip Zap on Facebook www.facebook.com/zipzapcircus and check out the Zip Zap YouTube channel here to find out more.

Celebrating 30-years of service in the Western Cape

 

Caption: It was a joyful evening at the Muizenberg Hall on Saturday, 08 October 2016 as local non-profit organisation, Mustadafin Foundation, hosted a Gala Dinner to celebrate their 30th year of bringing a positive change to the Western Cape community. Director of the Foundation, Ghairunisa Johnstone-Cassiem (above, bottom image) was one of the founders who in 1986 realised that something had to be done to help less fortunate communities in the Province.

“It has been an incredible journey, especially when one looks back at how we started and what we are now able to do today. We believe in creating self-sufficient, self-reliant and independent citizens; we achieve this through extensive and high-calibre programmes run by our volunteers and staff,” explains Johnstone-Cassiem.

 

Caption: From left to right: Ashfaak Dawood, Premier of the Western Cape, Helen Zille, Johnstone-Cassiem and Nazlie Berhardien at the Gala event.

Key stakeholders of the Foundation attended the Gala Dinner, including sponsors, donors and Western Cape Premier, Helen Zille. Johnstone-Cassiem acknowledged their support in a speech at the event: “Without your assistance, we would never have been able to make a difference in community members’ lives. All of us at the Foundation would like to thank you for the ongoing and invaluable support over many years.”  The Foundation also took the opportunity to thank four senior community members for their loyal contribution since 1986.

 

Caption: Youth from Mustadafin Foundation’s programmes entertained those in attendance with lively song and dance.

The non-profit provides educational programmes, skills training, disaster and poverty relief as well as youth and health development programmes throughout the year. The evening was in celebration of what has been achieved so far, but also the Foundation’s plans for the road ahead. The event was also held to raise funds to finalise the building and repair work to their new premises in Bridgetown.

“The success of our programmes are determined by our sponsors, particularly our corporate sponsors such as Pick n Pay, Standard Bank, Nedbank, Benjamin Transport, Retro Active, AMA, Absolute Rigging and A.K. Peer,” concludes Johnstone-Cassiem.

If you are able to make a donation or if you would like to find out more, contact Mustadafin Foundation on 021-633-0010 or visit www.mustadafin.org.za. Join their Facebook page at www.facebook.com/MustadafinFoundation.

Champions of transformation and empowerment celebrated at 2016 BBQ Awards

In honour of successful black business owners and top achievers across various industries, the 15th edition of the Black Business Quarterly (BBQ) Awards will be hosted on Thursday, 27 October 2016 from 16:00 until late at Emperors Palace in Ekurhuleni, Gauteng. As the crown jewel of the South African events calendar, the 2016 BBQ Awards is one of the country’s most prestigious and longest-running business award ceremonies that recognise and celebrate the champions of business transformation.

“South Africa desperately needs to address important issues such as education and unemployment, as the associated social-economic problems directly affect our dream for a prosperous rainbow nation. Promoting and empowering leaders of transformation in business is a key priority as it offers solutions to these social-economic difficulties. Events like the BBQ Awards provide a platform to celebrate and honour such individuals and organisations,” says Phumza Mbodlana, Event Organiser of the BBQ Awards 2016.

The aim of the BBQ Awards is to encourage and promote sustainable black business and transformation in South Africa. “Organisations and individuals are recognised for their good corporate governance, leadership and esteemed business achievements at the annual awards ceremony,” adds Mbodlana.

It promises to be an evening of excitement with South African stand-up comedian, actor, director and all-round entertainer Kagiso Lediga taking up the role of programme director. Jeff Radebe (Minister in the Presidency of Planning, Performance, Monitoring, Evaluation and Administration) and Susan Shabangu, (Minister in the Presidency for Women), will be joined by champions of South Africa’s business elite, along with numerous foreign dignitaries and senior government officials, in celebrating remarkable business achievements.

“The Awards will consist of 13 categories open to individuals, black-owned and empowered companies and organisations in South Africa that include Best Established Black Business, Outstanding Woman in Business, Young Business Achiever, as well as Transformation Champion and Community Builder of the Year,” explains Mbodlana.

Guests will be treated to world-class entertainers such as Loyiso Bala and Black Ivory, and will also be spoiled with a four-course meal fit for royalty. This year’s BBQ Awards will also be broadcast live online. “The live stream initiative will ensure that members of the public can follow all the festivities at the ceremony as they unfold,” says Mbodlana.

“We are extremely excited for this year’s event! The 15th anniversary of this esteemed awards ceremony will celebrate some of South Africa’s premier business transformation and empowerment achievements,” concludes Mbodlana.

For more information on the 2016 BBQ Awards contact Phumza Mbodlana on (021) 681 7000 or phumza.mbodlana@capemedia.co.za.