PPA and PenBev caring for commuters

Photo Caption – Bicycle commuters who were on their way to work on Wednesday morning (26 September 2012) were pleasantly surprised, when they received a helmet and reflective tape for their bicycles from the Pedal Power Association (PPA). Peninsula Beverages Company (PenBev – local bottler of Coca-Cola products in the Western and Northern Cape) sponsored 20 helmets and also provided each commuter with an ice cold refreshing Coca-Cola.

In preparation for October’s “Transport Month”, the PPA ‘gave back’ to the community when staff members of the Association, together with local Traffic Officers and friends of the PPA handed bicycle helmets and reflective bicycle strips to commuters from the Retreat, Grassy Park and Lavender Hill areas; in total 200 helmets and 800 reflective strips were handed out.

“This was such a wonderful surprise and I felt so very lucky this morning,” said Samuel Yobanda, who commutes daily between Lavender Hill and Tokai where he works night shifts as a security guard. “Thank you to the Pedal Power Association for helping to keep me safe on the road.”

For Matthew Fortune, who cycles daily between Retreat and Constantia, this was a dream come true. “I am so happy,” he said. “I need my bicycle every day but could not afford to buy a helmet.”

“The Helmet Safety Drive is part of the PPA’s annual project funding initiative,” explained PPA’s chairman, Steve Hayward. “We are in the fortunate position that the Pedal Power Association and the Rotary Club of Claremont are the beneficiaries of the Cape Town Cycle Tour Trust, who organises, amongst others, the annual Cape Argus Pick n Pay Cycle Tour. The PPA uses any profits received in this way to run the Association, and, in 2012-2013, will plough over R1,7 million into cycling projects,” said Hayward. These projects include specific commuter and safety drives like the helmet hand-outs and a campaign to make motorists more aware of the best practice 1.5m safe passing distance when motorists pass cyclists on our roads.

The Pedal Power Association (PPA) conducts these helmet hand-outs quarterly in an effort to ensure commuters are not only comply with the law, but to add to their safety by becoming more visible to motorists.

For more information on the PPA, please contact Tel: (021) 689-8420 or visit www.pedalpower.org.za

For more information on PenBev, please visit www.penbev.co.za.

 

Accreditation and Certification for members in the waste management sector

Waste industry experts across the country and internationally, will be descending on the East London International Convention Centre from 09 – 12 October 2012 to discuss pertinent waste management issues at this year’s WasteCon2012, South Africa’s largest waste management conference.

One of the many hot topics to be tackled by the Institute of Waste Management of Southern Africa (IWMSA) is accreditation and certification for its members.

WasteCon2012 Chairperson, Steve Kalule says, “The aim and purpose of the envisaged accreditation and certification scheme will be to establish a process of accrediting and/or certifying organisations to provide key services within the waste management value chain, including collection, transportation, transfer stations, recycling, re-use and recovery facilities, waste treatment as well as disposal.

“The accreditation and certification scheme will be a systematic process of assuring that service providers of these key waste management services adhere to pre-determined performance quality criteria complying with a national standard.

“As an organisation that encourages participative processes, we urge members to attend this session and we look forward to their valuable inputs and suggestion,” concludes Kalule

The IWMSA commissioned the Centre for Environmental Management (CEM) at the North-West University (NWU) to research the feasibility and possible approaches for the establishment of such an accreditation and/or certification scheme for its members to ensure quality assurance within the waste sector in South Africa. 

The CEM has undertaken extensive research and has used lessons learned from similar schemes both nationally and internationally.

Further details of the conference as well as a comprehensive programme can be viewed at www.wastecon.co.za.

The IWMSA focuses on providing education and training for its members, as well as other interested parties, whether private individuals or government entities. 

The IWMSA is a non-profit organisation comprising a body of dedicated professionals in their respective fields, who give freely and voluntarily of their time and expertise in order to effectively educate, promote and further the science and practice of waste management.  For more information, visit: www.iwmsa.co.za

 

Central University of Technology still free from Government administration

Bloemfontein – In the Free State High Court earlier today, 21 September 2012, the Department of Higher Education and Training was granted leave to appeal to the Supreme Court of Appeal after unsuccessfully attempting to place Central University of Technology, Free State (CUT) under administration.

Earlier this year the Minister of Higher Education, Honourable Blade Nzimande’s decision to place CUT under administration was set aside in the Free State high court due to unsubstantiated findings by the assessor, Prof Julian Smith that the Minister had relied on. Even though CUT has taken all the necessary steps possible to investigate and manage the issues and has appealed to the Minister to allow CUT’s Council to pursue the matter out of court, the Minister still opted to appeal the ruling.

According to the Vice-Chancellor, Professor Thandwa Mthembu, “Through our endeavours, we have shown deep respect and appreciation for having been entrusted with the privilege of leading this university to push the frontiers of social and technological innovation in the central region.  We remain committed, focused and on track to do this through a number of innovation platforms we have built over the years and recently.  At CUT we look forward to working with all stakeholders including the Minister of Higher Education and Training to advance socio-economic development in this region.

“We hope that the Supreme Court of Appeal will bring closure to this matter so that CUT continues to ensure that the University is held in high esteem in South Africa as well as internationally through research, innovation and quality graduate output,” concluded Mthembu.

Based on an agreement between both the Minister and CUT the court ordered that the present status at CUT remains as is pending the conclusion of the appeal – this effectively prevents the Minister from any attempts to take over control of the administration and or governance of CUT until such time as the appeal has been finalized. The appeal will be heard by the Supreme Court of Appeal on a date to be allocated by the President of the Supreme Court of Appeal.

For more information about CUT visit www.cut.ac.za

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Kids Learn to clean-up with Zibi

CAPTION ONE:

Learners at Lantana Primary School, Lentegeur, Mitchell’s Plain show their support for action against littering after the City of Cape Town’s WasteWise programme’s Zibi show by holding up impromptu banners which read “WasteWise say no to litter and dumping”, and “Illegal dumping is a criminal offence.  The Zibi show at Lantana Primary School was made possible with the support of Peninsula Beverage Company (PenBev), the local bottler of The Coca-Cola Company’s products in the Western Cape, who sponsored the show at the school as well as providing refreshments.

CAPTION TWO:

All eyes are on Zibi, the ostrich mascot of the City of Cape Town’s WasteWise programme and the enthusiastic programme facilitators as they thrill learners at Delta Primary School in Retreat.  Learners were taught the benefits of reducing waste, reusing and recycling as well as how important it is not to litter. Peninsula Beverage Company (PenBev), the local bottler of The Coca-Cola Company’s products in the Western Cape, in conjunction with The City of Cape Town’s WasteWise project, together identify schools at which to collaborate in presenting a Zibi show.

CAPTION THREE:

Zibi struts his stuff for learners at Klipfontein Primary School in Bonteheuwel.  The ostrich mascot of the City of Cape Town’s WasteWise programme plays a vital role in holding the attention of learners whilst teaching important lessons about why we should not litter.  The learners at Klipfontein Primary now know all about the benefits associated with reducing, reusing and recycling our waste and impact this can have on the health and cleanliness of our environment.  Peninsula Beverage Company (PenBev), the local bottler of The Coca-Cola Company’s products in the Western Cape proudly sponsored the occasion and provided refreshments for the learners.

Photographer: Craig Wilson

In the spirit of National Clean-up Week, learners from Lantana, Delta and Klipfontein Primary Schools in the Western Cape were entertained and educated by Zibi, the friendly ostrich mascot for the City of Cape Town’s WasteWise programme. The Zibi shows were made possible with the support of Peninsula Beverages Company (PenBev) – (local bottler of The Coca-Cola Company’s products in the Western Cape).  PenBev sponsored the shows for the three schools and provided refreshments on each occasion.

John Joubert, Marketing Director at PenBev says “It is very much a part of our company’s philosophy to give back and to live in a way that really does make a difference.  We are excited to assist in bringing across to learners the very important messages of not littering, minimising waste wherever possible, and recycling.

“Learners are enthusiastic and open, and respond exceptionally well to Zibi, the WasteWise programme’s ostrich mascot,” continues Joubert, “This means that they learn about the serious issues around littering in a fun format.  We hope that these lessons learned during the formative years, will be taken home and eventually translate into an overall healthier and cleaner environment.

Joubert concludes “At PenBev, we firmly believe that to be informed is to be empowered and that initiatives such as Clean-up Week and the City of Cape Town’s WasteWise programme are crucial in the overall education of our youth.  The benefits associated with early learning, and the subsequent behaviour modification which results from that learning are inestimable. Our society will benefit from raising awareness of environmental concerns which we hope will ultimately filter through across the board into our communities.”

For more information on the educational and environmental awareness initiatives with which PenBev is involved, contact PenBev 021 936 5500 or visit www.penbev.co.za.

For more information about the City of Cape Town’s WasteWise and other projects visit: www capetown.gov.za

Busting Aliens in Ikwezi

Learners from various schools in the Ikwezi area were eager to make their mark during Arbour week, earlier this month, by planting indigenous trees at their schools. In its bid to remain the greenest Province in South Africa, the Department of Environmental Affairs in the Eastern Cape together with the Ikwezi Municipality launched their “Alien Busters” initiative in the area, where they are taking strong action against Invasive Alien Plants (IAP). During Arbour Week 2012, the Alien Buster team visited selected areas and schools within the Ikwezi Municipality area educating the learners and community about IAPs and why it is important to eradicate them; topics such as the importance of indigenous trees, carbon dioxide imbalance as well as general appreciation and value for our environment also formed part of the information that was shared with the learners and community. Community members are encouraged to report anyone planting or selling IAPs within the Ikwezi Municipal area to the Municipality’s Community Services Directorate on 049-8360021

 Job creation forms an important part of the Alien Buster project currently being undertaken in the Ikwezi Municipality area, where communities are being taught about the importance of eradicating Invasive Alien Plants (IAPs) and planting indigenous trees such as the Spekboom. “The cactus type plants such as the torch cactus that has been brought in from Mexico are the greatest plant invaders in the area,” says Sizwe Mngwevu, Mayor of the Ikwezi Local Municipality. “These plants threaten and deplete our water resources, which are already very limited. It is important for us to educate communities about the importance of eliminating these invasive plants, and why they should not be grown at home.” concludes Mngwevu.

Community members are encouraged to report anyone planting or selling IAPs within the Ikwezi Municipal area to the Municipality’s Community Services Directorate on 049-8360021

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Leerders in Bloemfontein baat by Edublox se KSI inisiatief

Edublox Bloemfontein eienares Annelize Lategan besig om ‘n Edublox-klas vir Graad 1-leerders aan die Laerskool Bloemfontein aan te bied, as deel van die Edublox Korporatiewe Sosiale Investerings-inisiatief. Hierdie program gee leerders die grondslag vir die ontwikkeling van kognitiewe- en leesvaardighede.

‘n Wetenskaplike deurbraak onder leiding van Andrea Facoetti is by die Universiteit van Padua in Italië gemaak, toe bevind is dat daar ‘n korrelasie tussen visuele aandag tekorte by jong kinders, en latere diagnose van disleksie  bestaan. ‘n Visuele aandag tekort, of probleme met visueel-ruimtelike aandagspan, is ‘n onvermoë om tussen relevante en irrelevante inligting te onderskei. Die resultate van die studie dui daarop dat dit sinvol is om visueel-ruimtelike probleme in jong kinders d.m.v. terapie aan te spreek voordat hulle begin leer lees. Volgens die studie sal dit in baie gevalle latere diagnoses van disleksie uitskakel. 

Italiaanse kleuters was oor ‘n tydperk van drie jaar aan bogenoemde studie onderwerp. Die studie het geduur totdat hulle in Graad 2 was en die resultate het getoon dat kinders wat aan die begin, in hulle kleuterfase, met visuele aandag tekorte gediagnoseer was, later gesukkel het om te leer lees. Visuele aandag tekorte by kleuters was by verre ‘n beter voorspeller van latere disleksie, as wat taalvermoë was. Hierdie navorsingsresultate dui daarop dat daar radikaal anders besin sal moet word oor ons teoretiese raamwerk aangaande disleksie, en veronderstel dus ook dat sommige bestaande intervensies krities in oënskou geneem moet word.

Na aanleiding van die navorsingsresultate stel Facoetti voor dat kinders vroeg blootgestel word aan take wat hulle visuele aandag toets, sodat identifikasie van risiko-gevalle betyds gedoen kan word. Die risiko-gevalle kan dan aan voorkomende remediërende programme blootgestel word, om disleksie te keer voordat hierdie kinders leer lees.

Hierdie navorsing ondersteun die metodes wat by die Edublox-klinieke toegepas word en verklaar die uitstaande wat resultate wat verkry word met kinders wat leesprobleme ondervind. ‘Die goeie nuus’, sê Susan du Plessis, Direkteur van Opvoedkundige programme by Edublox, ‘is dat visuele aandag nie net ‘n onontbeerlike fondasievaardigheid van lees is nie, maar dat probleme daarmee suksesvol deur terapie aangespreek kan word. Ons navorsing, wat oor baie dekades strek, het bewys dat ‘n swak grondslag in kognitiewe vaardighede die grootste oorsaak van lees- en leerprobleme is. By Edublox ontwikkel en verbeter ons hierdie kognitiewe vaardighede deur dinamiese opleiding en oefening.’

Terwyl dit vanselfsprekend klink dat geen kind sonder hierdie voorreg behoort te wees nie, is die realiteit dat baie leerders nie toegang tot Edublox-programme het nie. Ten einde hierdie ongelukkige toedrag van sake aan te spreek, het Edublox begin met ‘n reeks Korporatiewe Sosiale Investerings-inisiatiewe om hulle intervensies toeganklik te maak vir kinders wat nie andersins die voorreg sou geniet nie.

Die Edublox-kliniek in Bloemfontein het homself daartoe verbind om uit te reik na behoeftige skole in Mangaung, en is tans besig om vir ‘n groep leerders aan die Laerskool Bloemfontein, gratis Edublox-klasse aan te bied. Die projek fokus op leerders wat ekstra onderrig benodig, maar dit nie kan bekostig nie. Twintig Graad 1-leeders trek voordeel uit die onderrig. Mnr van der Mescht, die skoolhoof, sê dit is duidelik dat die Edublox-klasse waarde toevoeg. Volgens Mnr van der Mescht geniet hulle die lesse baie. Hy sê een leerder het, op ‘n vraag na hulle belewenis van die projek, geantwoord: ‘Ons bou met blokkies en dis pret!’ 

Die Edublox-klasse het beduidende gapings in die kinders se kognitiewe ontwikkeling uitgewys; gapings wat nou suksesvol aangespreek word. ‘Ek is opgewonde oor die verskil wat alreeds gesien kan word’, sê Edublox Bloemfontein se eienares, Annelize Lategan. ‘Eintlik staan ek verstom. Dis amper onwerklik om te sien hoe die leerders se lees– en leervaardighede verbeter het. En dis nie net hulle skoolwerk wat verbeter nie, maar hulle selfwaarde kry sommer ook ‘n hupstoot.’

Meer inligting oor Edublox kan verkry word deur Annelize Lategan by 051-430 7492 / 083-429 4156 te skakel, of die webblad www.edublox.co.za te besoek.

Verwysing:
Facoetti A., et al, Current Biology, Volume 22, Issue 9, 814-819, 2012.

Edublox CSI projects bring brain training programs to learners in Krugersdorp

Caption: Edublox Krugersdorp franchise owner Nicolene Potgieter gives individual attention to a learner. The Edublox programme helps learners to develop a good foundation in cognitive skills development and reading ability.   

Groundbreaking new research conducted by the University of Padua in Italy* has revealed that a fundamental connection exists between early problems with visual spatial attention (the ability to filter relevant versus irrelevant information) and a later diagnosis of dyslexia. The study also suggests that addressing visual spatial attention deficits in children prior to reading age can result in a reduction in the number of children developing dyslexia in the first place.

Studies conducted on Italian children over a period of three years, from the time they were pre-reading kindergarteners until they entered second grade, showed that kids who initially had trouble with visual attention were also the ones to later struggle with reading. Visual attention deficits were found to be way more indicative of future reading disorders than language ability deficits at the pre-reading stage. This is a radical change in thinking to the former theoretical framework explaining dyslexia and suggests that rehabilitation treatments formerly applied for treating reading difficulties and dyslexia should be reconsidered.

“Simple visual-attention tasks should improve the early identification of children at risk of developing dyslexia,” says Andrea Facoetti, the researcher who headed up the studies at the University of Padua. “Because recent studies show that specific pre-reading programs can improve reading abilities, children at risk of developing dyslexia could be treated with preventive remediation programs of visual spatial attention before they learn to read,” Facoetti explains.

This research supports the methodologies applied at Edublox clinics and explains the outstanding results that Edublox has achieved with children battling with reading difficulties. “The good news is that visual attention is not only an essential reading readiness skill, but is responsive to therapeutic intervention,” says Susan du Plessis, Director of Educational Programs at Edublox. “Our own research over many decades has shown that a weak foundation in cognitive skills is the biggest hurdle facing struggling learners and readers. At Edublox we improve, strengthen and enhance these mental skills through dynamic training and practice, effectively training the brain through group classes and custom designed computer programs,” she explains.

While these benefits seem like something no child should do without, not all learners have access to the beneficial programs that Edublox offers.  With this in mind, Edublox has embarked on a series of Corporate Social Investment (CSI) projects to bring their methodologies to learners who would otherwise not have had access to them.

The Edublox franchise in Krugersdorp recently presented some study techniques taken from the Edublox Studiblox course, free of charge, to all the grade four learners at Protearif Primary School. “The learners thoroughly enjoyed the presentation and felt that the methods they had been shown would be tremendously helpful when studying for their exams,” says Nicolene Potgieter, owner of the Edublox Krugersdorp franchise. “Most of them had never been taught or even heard of these techniques before and even the teachers said that they had learnt something new.” Potgieter plans to give the same presentation to the grade seven learners at the school in due course.

A number of learners from Protearif Primary School are attending Edublox classes at the Krugersdorp clinic and the school regularly refers more learners to Edublox. One learner from the school, who could not afford the classes but clearly needed the extra tutorage, was selected jointly by the school and franchise to receive Edublox classes free of charge. “He attends his classes devoutly and is making very good progress,” says Potgieter. “With time, as the franchise grows, we will definitely look at offering more disadvantaged learners the opportunity to receive free classes,” she explains.

“We can attest to a lot of success stories with learners that are attending the Edublox courses,” says Mr Lourens, principal of Protearif Primary School. “Edublox can make a positive difference to the children’s academic performance and this is something we have certainly experienced at our school. We are very grateful for the relationship Edublox has fostered with our school,” he concludes.

For more information about Edublox in Krugersdorp, contact Nicolene Potgieter on: 011 954 3867 or nicolene@edublox.com or visit www.edublox.co.za .

References:

* Studies were conducted by researcher Andrea Facoetti and his team including Sandro Franceschini, Simone Gori, Milena Ruffino, and Katia Pedrolli, from the University of Padua in Italy.

Edublox CSI projects bring brain training programs to learners in Pretoria

Caption: Edublox tutor, Mr Bernett Baloyi, presenting the Edublox program to Grade 1 learners at Confidence College in the Pretoria CBD as part of an Edublox CSI initiative. This programme helps the learners to develop a good foundation in cognitive skills development and reading ability.   

Groundbreaking new research conducted by the University of Padua in Italy* has revealed that a fundamental connection exists between early problems with visual spatial attention (the ability to filter relevant versus irrelevant information) and a later diagnosis of dyslexia. The study also suggests that addressing visual spatial attention deficits in children prior to reading age can result in a reduction in the number of children developing dyslexia in the first place.

Studies conducted on Italian children over a period of three years, from the time they were pre-reading kindergarteners until they entered second grade, showed that kids who initially had trouble with visual attention were also the ones to later struggle with reading. Visual attention deficits were found to be way more indicative of future reading disorders than language ability deficits at the pre-reading stage. This is a radical change in thinking to the former theoretical framework explaining dyslexia and suggests that rehabilitation treatments formerly applied for treating reading difficulties and dyslexia should be reconsidered.

“Simple visual-attention tasks should improve the early identification of children at risk of developing dyslexia,” says Andrea Facoetti, the researcher who headed up the studies at the University of Padua. “Because recent studies show that specific pre-reading programs can improve reading abilities, children at risk of developing dyslexia could be treated with preventive remediation programs of visual spatial attention before they learn to read,” Facoetti explains.

This research supports the methodologies applied at Edublox clinics and explains the outstanding results that Edublox has achieved with children battling with reading difficulties. “The good news is that visual attention is not only an essential reading readiness skill, but is responsive to therapeutic intervention,” says Susan du Plessis, Director of Educational Programs at Edublox. “Our own research over many decades has shown that a weak foundation in cognitive skills is the biggest hurdle facing struggling learners and readers. At Edublox we improve, strengthen and enhance these mental skills through dynamic training and practice, effectively training the brain through group classes and custom designed computer programs,” she explains.

While these benefits seem like something no child should do without, not all learners have access to the beneficial programs that Edublox offers.  With this in mind, Edublox has embarked on a series of Corporate Social Investment (CSI) projects to bring their methodologies to learners who would otherwise not have had access to them.

The Edublox franchise in Pretoria has been providing Edublox tutorage free of charge to learners at Confidence College, a school in the Pretoria CBD that provides schooling and aftercare to learners from preschool to Grade 7. The collaboration started in 2011 when Edublox began presenting classes to Grade 2 and 3 learners during their school day. Edublox tutor, Mr Bernett Baloyi, gives classes at the school once a week, moving from class to class during the course of the morning. This year the Edublox program is being run with nearly 90 Grade 1 learners at the school, and will continue to be offered to the Grade 1 learners in future years ensuring that they go on to the later grades with a good foundation when it comes to cognitive skills development and reading ability.   

“Teachers have reported a vast improvement in the learners’ comprehension tests,” says Confidence College principal, Anelize van Eeden, “and the concentration of the learners has definitely improved.”

For more information on Edublox contact Susan du Plessis on (012) 345-1480 /  info@edublox.com or visit www.edublox.co.za .

References:

* Studies were conducted by researcher Andrea Facoetti and his team including Sandro Franceschini, Simone Gori, Milena Ruffino, and Katia Pedrolli, from the University of Padua in Italy.

Edublox CSI projects bring brain training programs to learners in Bloemfontein

Caption: Edublox Bloemfontein franchise owner, Annelize Lategan, presenting the Edublox program to Grade one learners at Bloemfontein Primary School as part of an Edublox CSI initiative. This programme helps the learners to develop a good foundation in cognitive skills development and reading ability.   

Groundbreaking new research conducted by the University of Padua in Italy* has revealed that a fundamental connection exists between early problems with visual spatial attention (the ability to filter relevant versus irrelevant information) and a later diagnosis of dyslexia. The study also suggests that addressing visual spatial attention deficits in children prior to reading age can result in a reduction in the number of children developing dyslexia in the first place.

Studies conducted on Italian children over a period of three years, from the time they were pre-reading kindergarteners until they entered second grade, showed that kids who initially had trouble with visual attention were also the ones to later struggle with reading. Visual attention deficits were found to be way more indicative of future reading disorders than language ability deficits at the pre-reading stage. This is a radical change in thinking to the former theoretical framework explaining dyslexia and suggests that rehabilitation treatments formerly applied for treating reading difficulties and dyslexia should be reconsidered.

“Simple visual-attention tasks should improve the early identification of children at risk of developing dyslexia,” says Andrea Facoetti, the researcher who headed up the studies at the University of Padua. “Because recent studies show that specific pre-reading programs can improve reading abilities, children at risk of developing dyslexia could be treated with preventive remediation programs of visual spatial attention before they learn to read,” Facoetti explains.

This research supports the methodologies applied at Edublox clinics and explains the outstanding results that Edublox has achieved with children battling with reading difficulties. “The good news is that visual attention is not only an essential reading readiness skill, but is responsive to therapeutic intervention,” says Susan du Plessis, Director of Educational Programs at Edublox. “Our own research over many decades has shown that a weak foundation in cognitive skills is the biggest hurdle facing struggling learners and readers. At Edublox we improve, strengthen and enhance these mental skills through dynamic training and practice, effectively training the brain through group classes and custom designed computer programs,” she explains.

While these benefits seem like something no child should do without, not all learners have access to the beneficial programs that Edublox offers.  With this in mind, Edublox has embarked on a series of Corporate Social Investment (CSI) projects to bring their methodologies to learners who would otherwise not have had access to them.

The Edublox franchise in Bloemfontein has engaged in an outreach project to needy schools in the Mangaung district. The Bloemfontein franchise, which has been operational since April 2012, is currently involved in assisting a group of learners at Bloemfontein Primary School free of charge. This project is aimed at learners who are in need of extra tutorage, but are not necessarily able to afford it.

A group of 20 grade one learners has been selected to benefit from what Edublox has to offer.

The school principal, Mr Hennie van der Mescht, says, “The children are enjoying their Edublox classes very much and we can see that the program is adding a lot of value for these learners.” When asked their opinion of the classes one learner stated, “We build with blocks – it’s fun!”

The Edublox classes indicated a significant gap in the children’s cognitive development which can now be addressed. “I am excited to notice a difference already,” says Edublox Bloemfontein franchise owner, Annelize Lategan. “It’s really amazing and almost unreal to see the children’s’ reading and learning skills improve. And it’s not only their scholastic performance that is improving but their self-esteem is boosted as well.”

For more information on Edublox contact Annelize Lategan on 051-430 7492 / 083-429 4156 or visit www.edublox.co.za .

References:

* Studies were conducted by researcher Andrea Facoetti and his team including Sandro Franceschini, Simone Gori, Milena Ruffino, and Katia Pedrolli, from the University of Padua in Italy.

Minister Blade Nzimande’s Application for Leave to Appeal against the Judgment is a waste of taxpayers’ money

Bloemfontein – Central University of Technology (CUT) is concerned by the Minister of Higher Education, Honourable Blade Nzimande’s decision to appeal the case he lost in his attempt to place CUT under administration.

CUT approached the Minister, as it did in February 2012, with a view to resolving any concerns and outstanding matters through a less invasive paralegal process. Nzimande however refused and opted to exercise his right of election by filing an application for leave to appeal; thereby opting for a route that will waste more taxpayers’ money.

Anonymous letters submitted to the Minister by allegedly disgruntled employees in 2011, led the Minister to appoint an independent assessor, Prof Julian Smith, to investigate allegations of impropriety at CUT. The assessor purported to find intimidation, victimization and mismanagement of staff members as well as misappropriation of funds. These matters were however not substantiated even before the high court. Albeit the reports being unfounded, the Minister appointed an administrator. The high court ruled in favour of CUT’s application to set aside the Minister’s decision mainly due to the lack of supporting evidence presented by the assessor and the Minister in his court papers.

“Spending more time in court is an unnecessary pursuit for CUT that is working hard to maintain its emerging status as a ‘cut above the rest’. Any further expenditure of taxpayers’ money in litigating this matter is unnecessary,” says Professor Thandwa Mthembu, Vice Chancellor of CUT. “We have taken and are continuing to take all the necessary steps fathomable to investigate and manage the issues and we have appealed to the Minister to allow CUT’s Council to pursue the matter out of court. We continue to be optimistic and look forward to his favourable response,” Mthembu concluded.

More about CUT

CUT is a leader in many technology fields ranging from learning programmes in Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) a broad field in which CUT has about 45% of its enrolments, much higher than many other South African universities. Further, CUT’s research and innovation leadership in many areas, more especially in rapid prototyping and manufacturing is world class. The latter has been honoured by both the Medical Research Council (MRC) as part of its National Medical Device Platform and the National Research Foundation (NRF), with the latter having granted CUT a Chair in this area. Through its social and technological innovations CUT aims to contribute towards the social-economic development in the region as well as in the rest of South Africa and internationally.

For more information about CUT visit www.cut.ac.za